Can I Get a Do-over?

2 Jul

20140703-071739-26259138.jpg

Everywhere, every day, someone just wants a “do-over.” Bad day? Burned dinner? Lost keys? Fight with my teenager? Sometimes the minutia just makes me want to crawl in bed and try again tomorrow.

In my personal journey to be more present in the moment AND to build the life I want, I’m soooo impatient and distracted. Distractions that usually come from focusing too much on what’s going WRONG instead of what’s going RIGHT. In her article Starting New, A Moment of Choice, Madisyn Taylor wrote “giving all of our attention to the unwanted aspects of our lives allows what we resist to persist.”

Every moment in life, we can choose a different attitude or a different path. We don’t have to wait to start exercising, eating right or saving money. Not happy with the last choice you made?

YES you can get a do-over. Anytime. We can’t change the past, but we control how we react in the future. Choose differently right now.

Another excerpt (read the whole article here)

“Starting new is most powerful when we focus our attention to what we are choosing to create. We need to remember to leave enough room in the process of new beginnings to be kind to ourselves, because it takes time to become accustomed to anything new, no matter how much we like it. There is no need to get down on ourselves if we don’t reach our new goals instantly. Instead, we acknowledge the forward motion and choose to reset and start again, knowing that with each choice we learn, grow, and move forward.”

Prescription for Productivity

12 Sep

I had the pleasure of presenting with PR rockstar Linda Rutherford (@SWAFollower), and some of my favorite new media peeps Lin Humphrey (@linhumphrey) and Kaley Daniel (@kaleydaniel) along with a whole slew of other practitioners from the local area and beyond. Sadly, I didn’t get to stay for the day, but the hashtag has all the highlights! #socialmedia201.

Let’s do this again!

And on the topic of productivity, here’s how Phil Libin (CEO of Evernote) organizes his Evernote stacks, notebooks, notes and tags.

Brands Shouldn’t Ignore Twitter Complaints

26 Oct

Don't let your customers talk to the hand. Listen to your brand mentions.


I know what they say about anecdotal research, but recent findings by Maritz Research confirm my personal experience as a Twitter user and community manager. If people take the time to complain about a brand on twitter, they expect a response. Further, ANY type of response is usually better than nothing.

Takeaways? Monitor mentions of your brand using simple tools like Tweetdeck. Take a few minutes each day to respond, especially to negative comments. (Of course it’s nice to respond to positive feedback too!)

Resarch Summary

Maritz Research surveyed an online panel of 1,298 US consumers at least 18 years of age pre-identified as:

  • Twitter users who frequently tweet
  • Those who have used Twitter to complain about a specific product, service, brand or company

Results:

  • Nearly half of respondents expected the company to read their Tweet
  • Nearly 1/3 of respondents received a response from the company about their Twitter complaint

Of those who received follow-up:

  • 83% said they liked or loved hearing from the company
  • Only 4% didn’t like or hated hearing from the company
  • 63% would not like it or hate it if the company contacted them about something other than their complaint tweet

Read the full summary.

Lies, Damn Lies and Social Media

11 Oct

A single tweet sparks an inferno. (More like Mrs. O'Leary's cow).

AKA, the tweet heard ’round the world.

I generally don’t blog about work-related crises (especially when it’s sports-related), but this weekend’s social media mayhem deserves an exception.

I have witnessed how fast real news and fake news can spread via social media, especially twitter. What makes us hit the RT or the share button so quickly? I’ll leave that to behavioral experts. Even as my fingers are itching to spread information as fast as I can (and, oh, to be the first is so thrilling), I take the extra time to confirm what I’m sharing. I want my followers and friends to trust my updates.

As everyone knows, Texas Tech and Texas A&M are huge rivals, so I was definitely prepared for a social media smackdown Saturday and Sunday (especially if we lost). What I wasn’t prepared for came in via Facebook about 2:40 pm Saturday. “Shame shame tech fans! Disgusting what was done to A&M busses!”

Wait, what?

By Sunday morning, Twitter, Facebook, bloggers and mainstream media from USA Today to ESPN had LITERALLY picked up the ball and run with it. The ball? A tweet from A&M AD Bill Byrne.

Our own community was ripping us apart, condemning our students for everything from spray painting the buses to physically depositing bowl movements on the bus floors. With no proof, no police report, no investigation, no … FACTS. Just a single tweet.

I was very proud of the statement issued late yesterday (10/10) by Texas Tech AFTER an investigation had been conducted:

Many of you are aware of a tweet from a Texas A&M official that their team buses were spray painted and animal feces were spread inside of the buses early Saturday morning. The clear implication of the tweet was that this was the responsibility of Texas Tech fans or students. Texas Tech has conducted an investigation regarding this allegation, and has discovered the following:

  • The buses were not spray painted. Instead, washable shoe polish was used on the windows of one of the buses.
  • No feces were found either in or on the buses. Fish bait was dropped onto the floor of one of the buses.
  • The alleged “vandalism” was cleaned by the bus drivers and Holiday Inn staff before it was seen by the A&M official who tweeted the information.

While incidents such as the ones alleged are inappropriate and strongly condemned by Texas Tech, it is no less wrong to condemn the entirety of our university, students and supporters by posting inaccurate information on the internet for the purpose of sensationalizing the actions of one or a very few. We are disturbed by the careless use of social media to share these inaccuracies.

Indeed.

A Shrine (and a Rant)

7 Oct

RIP Steve Jobs

It just so happens that my office is the coolest AND we happen to have an old Macintosh Classic. We created a shrine with everything Apple we could get our hands on (along with a stuffed bear, candy and incense). As usual, we went a bit overboard.

I uploaded one of the pix to Facebook yesterday and got a quick introduction on the new feature that allows “friends of friends” to comment on photos they are tagged in. Some guy wrote a snarky comment about the microsoft keyboard. I don’t know why it irked me so much, but I deleted it. Yeah, I guess if you’re a purist, it’s out of place. But we put a cross up and Jobs was a Buddhist.

I really think Steve would enjoy the diversity. After all, I think his success had a lot to do with his “multilingual” approach to Apple products in the last 10 years or so. They quit battling it out with Microsoft over personal computing. They made all of the “i” devices agnostic so they appealed to anyone who liked music, needed a phone or wanted an awesome tablet experience. Of course they are still in the computing business, but they succeed by making excellent products … not just keeping up with “competitors.” When Steve Jobs talked, he was a rock star, everyone listened. Bill Gates still has fans, but honestly, he is known more for his philanthropy than anything else.

I admit, I like to give my Mac friends a hard time, but I’m a PC mostly because I know too many Windows shortcuts to change now.

So my wish and prayer at the shrine: “Can’t we all just get along?”

RIP Steve Jobs, 1955-2011.

Steve Jobs OCM Shrine

Foursquare vs. Twitter

22 Jul
Is the checkin mightier than the tweet?

Is the checkin mightier than the tweet?

I was guest lecturing with a colleague (Scott Irlbeck) at an emerging media class this week and one of the students pointed out that Texas Tech has nearly as many followers on Foursquare as we do on Twitter.

WHAT?

Wait. That can’t be right. Can it?

Foursquare recently celebrated 10 million users, while Twitter has surpassed 200 million users (of course I’m betting 20% or more of those accounts are spam).

How is it possible that the Texas Tech twitter account that was launched in November, 2008, has just over 12,000 followers and our Foursquare account, launched in July last year, has nearly 11,000? I would love for the Texas Tech team to take all the credit, but I’m scratching my head over this one. We are located in Lubbock after all. Specials and discounts are not exactly easy to come by.

Is gamification really that powerful? I have more questions than I have answers. What do you think?

Aggregation or Plagiarism?

17 Jul
Are current aggregation practices crossing the line into plagiarism?

Are current aggregation practices crossing the line into plagiarism?

The almighty HuffPo was called out by Simon Dumenco of AdAge last week in his article What It’s Like to Get Used and Abused by The Huffington Post. Be sure and read the article. He makes a well-researched case against their aggregation habits.

Many of the publications I subscribe to (especially through email) aggregate other sources of content pretty heavily. I’m pretty used to it, after all, my guilty pleasure is celebrity gossip. TMZ is often the source for breaking entertainment news, but the entertainment biz has historically been more forthcoming with source credits. Enter Huffington Post, et al.

I am pretty disturbed by the aggregation of content without upfront attribution. It’s simply not enough to mention it at the end of a post. Aggregation of content works for everyone. I could only dream of being picked up by a major outlet. But, let’s face it, I would be pretty steamed if someone quoted me nearly word-for-word without proper attribution.

What do you think? Are we crossing a line in favor of sharing content?

Lisa DuBois Low is co-founder of SmartGirlsDigital and writes for the company blog, where this article originally ran. Follow SmartGirlsDigital on Twitter @SmartGirls2 and like us on Facebook.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,039 other followers